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Thursday, January 18, 2007

Archdiocese of New York

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To announce "realignment plans" tomorrow.

Heresy central

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Also known as the Sisters of the Holy Names of Jesus and Mary.

Their former glory.

The website that shows the whole decay in slow motion.

The beginning


and the end

Manifesto for the Latin Mass

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in Germany. For the Pope's own language in the Pope's other language.

Epiphany 2007

Manifesto for the renewed permission for the traditional Latin Mass

It is also important for the correct formation in liturgical matters that in the final analysis the outlawing of the form of the Mass valid until 1970 must cease. Such a ban has never happened in the whole of recorded history, as if the whole past of the Catholic Church could be annulled. How could one trust her presenly, if one abolishes her past? (Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger, God and the World, Munich 2000).

The undersigned welcome that Pope Benedict XVI will generally re-permit the celebration of the traditional Latin Mass as a consequence of his oft-stated policy. As early as 1971, several well-known international personalities such as the writers, Graham Greene and Agatha Christie, the pianist, Vladimir Askenazy and the violinist, Yehudi Menuhin issued a joint-appeal.

They saw in the traditional Catholic Mass an overwhelming opus of world culture, comparable to the great cathedrals and churches that have been built for this very liturgy and that no cultured person could allow to lapse.

Gregorian chant is integral to and has grown out of the Old Rite and it is without date one of the most superb treasures of the world. The beauty and sublimity of the Latin Mass has been a source for the greatest composers in their much admired musical work. In fact, one cannot understand anymore the significant creations by Palestrina, Charpentier, Bach, Beethoven, Bruckner, Haydn or Mozart without the Latin Mass. The traditional “Divine Liturgy” of the West joins the Church of today directly with the Latin culture of the Middle Ages and antiquity, in a similar manner to the “Divine Liturgy” of the East has inspired Greek culture. Therefore, a re-permission of the Latin Mass would provide a strong impetus for a broader concern with the cultural roots of the West.

In the time of a united Europe and a worldwide exchange between peoples, this would be a considerable advantage not to be underestimated which has been formulated by Pope John XXIII at the time of the Second Vatican Council in the Apostolic Constitution “Veterum sapientia”

“Of its very nature Latin is most suitable for promoting every form of culture among peoples. It gives rise to no jealousies. It does not favor any one nation, but presents itself with equal impartiality to all and is equally acceptable to all.”

Manifesto for the renewed permission for the traditional Latin Mass

It is also important for the correct formation in liturgical matters that in the final analysis the outlawing of the form of the Mass valid until 1970 must cease. Such a ban has never happened in the whole of recorded history, as if the whole past of the Catholic Church could be annulled. How could one trust her presently, if one abolishes her past? (Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger, God and the World, Munich 2000).

The undersigned welcome that Pope Benedict XVI will generally re-permit the celebration of the traditional Latin Mass as a consequence of his oft-stated policy. As early as 1971, several well-known international personalities such as the writers, Graham Greene and Agatha Christie, the pianist, Vladimir Askenazy and the violinist, Yehudi Menuhin issued a joint-appeal.

They saw in the traditional Catholic Mass an overwhelming opus of world culture, comparable to the great cathedrals and churches that have been built for this very liturgy and that no cultured person could allow to lapse.

Gregorian chant is integral to and has grown out of the Old Rite and it is without date one of the most superb treasures of the world. The beauty and sublimity of the Latin Mass has been a source for the greatest composers in their much admired musical work. In fact, one cannot understand anymore the significant creations by Palestrina, Charpentier, Bach, Beethoven, Bruckner, Haydn or Mozart without the Latin Mass. The traditional “Divine Liturgy” of the West joins the Church of today directly with the Latin culture of the Middle Ages and antiquity, in a similar manner to the “Divine Liturgy” of the East has inspired Greek culture. Therefore, a re-permission of the Latin Mass would provide a strong impetus for a broader concern with the cultural roots of the West.

In the time of a united Europe and a worldwide exchange between peoples, this would be a considerable advantage not to be underestimated which has been formulated by Pope John XXIII at the time of the Second Vatican Council in the Apostolic Constitution “Veterum sapientia”



“Of its very nature Latin is most suitable for promoting every form of culture among peoples. It gives rise to no jealousies. It does not favor any one nation, but presents itself with equal impartiality to all and is equally acceptable to all.”

Signatures, alphabetical order

Consuelo Gräfin Ballestrem, Diplom-Psychologin
Dr. Heinz-Lothar Barth, Universitätsdozent der Klassischen Philologie,
und Frau Raphaela Barth
Dr. Johann von Behr, Bankangestellter
Wolfgang Johannes Bekh, Schriftsteller
Dr. Felix Bentz, Diplom-Ingenieur
Prof. Dr. Dr. h.c. Hugo Brandenburg, Archäologe
Prof. Dr. Peter Bruns, Professor für Kirchengeschichte
Marie Czernin, Journalistin
Prof. Dr. John Dudley, Philosoph
Prof. Dr. Hans Heribert Derix, Professor für Volkswirtschaftslehre
Prof. Dr. Edith Düsing, Philosophin
Dr. Anna Egler, Universitätsdozentin a. D. für Kirchenrecht
Prof. Dr. Rudolf Ehmann, Mediziner
Dr. Caelestis Eichenseer OSB, Theologe und Latinist
Prof. Dr. Wilhelm Geerlings, Kirchenhistoriker und Patrologe
Prof. Dr. Christian Gnilka, Klassischer Philologe
Leonhard Graf von Habsburg, Dipl.-Ing. und Dipl.Wirtsch.-Ing.
Ulla Hahn, Schriftstellerin
Privatdozent Dr. habil. Christian Hecht, Kunsthistoriker
Prof. Dr. Rainer Henke, Klassischer Philologe
Prof. Dr. Walter Hoeres, Philosoph
Dr. Algirdas Kakarieka, Neurochirurg und med. Direktor
Dr. Rudolf Kaschewsky, Universitätsdozent a. D. der Ostasienwissenschaften
Prof. Dr. H.A.J.M. Lamers, Politologe
Dr. Heiner Lichtenberg, Mathematiker
Prof. Dr. Godo Lieberg, Klassischer Philologe
Prof. Dr. Peter Martin Litfin, Wirtschaftsprüfer und Offizialatsanwalt
Prof. Dr. Konrad Löw, Professor für Politikwissenschaft
Ralf Lürig, Diplom-Kunstmaler und Kirchenmaler
Prof. Dr. Georg May, Professor für Kirchenrecht
Bernhard Mihm, Stadtrat a. D.
Martin Mosebach, Schriftsteller
Prof. Dr. Christian Pietsch, Klassischer Philologe
Prof. Dr. Dr. h.c. Charles Probst, Neurochirurg, und Frau Dr. Cécile Probst
Prof. Dr. Albert Richenhagen, Musikwissenschaftler, und Frau Dr. Elisabeth Richenhagen
Dr. Guido Rodheudt, Pfarrer
Dr. Helmut Rönz, Wissenschaftlicher Referent, Historiker
Prof. Dr. Dr. Klaus Rosen, Althistoriker
Privatdozent Dr. habil. Josef Johannes Schmid, Historiker
Dr. Heidemarie Seblatnig, Universitätsdozentin der Architekturwissenschaften
Dr. Hans Otto Seitschek, Wissenschaftlicher Assistent am Guardini-Lehrstuhl/München
Dr. Marc Stegherr, Universitätsdozent der Slavischen Philologie und der Geschichte Osteuropas
Prof. Dr. Michael Stickelbroeck, Professor für Dogmatik
Botho Strauß, Schriftsteller
Prof. Dr. Wilfried Stroh, Klassischer Philologe
Inge M. Thürkauf, Schauspielerin und Publizistin
Dr. Michael Tunger, Musikwissenschaftler und Kirchenmusiker
Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Waldstein, Professor für Römisches Recht
Prälat Dr. Markus Walser, Generalvikar der Erzdiözese Liechtenstein
Prof. Dr. Dieter J. Weiß, Historiker
Prof. Dr. Alfons Weische, Klassischer Philologe
Dr. Gero P. Weishaupt, Priester und Kanonist
Prof. Dr. Alfred Wendehorst, Historiker
Dr. Markus Wessel, Richter am Oberlandesgericht, und Frau Riem Wessel
Dr. Claudia Wick, Lexikographin an der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften
Dr. Gero Winkelmann, Mediziner